Addressing Table

Objectives
Part 1: Review Routing Configurations
Part 2: Configure PPP as the Encapsulation Method
Part 3: Configure PPP Authentication

Background
In this activity, you will practice configuring PPP encapsulation on serial links. You will also configure PPP PAP authentication and PPP CHAP authentication.

Part 1: Review Routing Configurations
Step 1: View running configurations on all routers.

While reviewing the router configurations, note the use of both static and dynamic routes in the topology.

Step 2: Test connectivity between computers and the webserver.
From PC and Laptop, ping the webserver at 209.165.200.2. Both ping commands should be successful. Remember to give enough time for STP and EIGRP to converge.
Part 2: Configure PPP as the Encapsulation Method
Step 1: Configure R1 to use PPP encapsulation with R3.

Enter the following commands on R1:
R1(config)#int s0/0/0
R1(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
R1(config-if)#

Step 2: Configure R2 to use PPP encapsulation with R3.
Enter the appropriate commands on R2:
R2(config)#int s0/0/1
R2(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
R2(config-if)#

Step 3: Configure R3 to use PPP encapsulation with R1, R2, and ISP.
Enter the appropriate commands on R3:
R3(config)#int s0/0/0
R3(config-if)#encapsulation ppp

R3(config-if)#int s0/0/1
R3(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
R3(config-if)#

R3(config-if)#int s0/1/0
R3(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
R3(config-if)#

Step 4: Configure ISP to use PPP encapsulation with R3.

a. Click the Internet cloud, then ISP. Enter the following commands:

Router(config)#int s0/0/0
Router(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)#

b. Exit the Internet cloud by clicking Back in the upper left corner or by pressing the Alt+left arrow.

Step 5: Test connectivity to the webserver.

PC and Laptop should be able to ping the webserver at 209.165.200.2. This may take some time as interfaces start working again and EIGRP reconverges.

Packet Tracer PC Command Line 1.0
C:>ping 209.165.200.2

Pinging 209.165.200.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=12ms TTL=125
Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=125
Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=13ms TTL=125

Ping statistics for 209.165.200.2:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 3, Lost = 1 (25% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 12ms, Maximum = 20ms, Average = 15ms

C:>

Part 3: Configure PPP Authentication
Step 1: Configure PPP PAP Authentication Between R1 and R3.

Note: Instead of using the keyword password as shown in the curriculum, you will use the keyword secret to provide better encryption of the password.

a. Enter the following commands into R1:

R1(config)#username R3 secret class
R1(config)#int s0/0/0
R1(config-if)#ppp authentication pap
R1(config-if)#
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0/0/0, changed state to down
%DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: IP-EIGRP 1: Neighbor 10.1.1.2 (Serial0/0/0) is down: interface down

R1(config-if)#ppp pap sent-username R1 password cisco
R1(config-if)#

b. Enter the following commands into R3:

R3(config)#username R1 secret cisco
R3(config)#int s0/0/0
R3(config-if)#ppp authentication pap
R3(config-if)#ppp pap sent-username R3 password class
R3(config-if)#

Step 2: Configure PPP PAP Authentication Between R2 and R3.
Repeat step 1 to configure authentication between R2 and R3 changing the usernames as needed. Note that each password sent on each serial port matches the password expected by the opposite router.

R2(config)#username R3 secret class
R2(config-if)#ppp authentication pap
R2(config-if)#ppp pap sent-username R2 password cisco
R2(config-if)#

R3(config)#username R2 secret cisco
R3(config)#int s0/0/1
R3(config-if)#ppp authentication pap
R3(config-if)#ppp pap sent-username R3 password class
R3(config-if)#

Step 3: Configure PPP CHAP Authentication Between R3 and ISP.

a. Enter the following commands into ISP. The hostname is sent as the username:

Router(config)#hostname ISP
ISP(config)#username R3 secret cisco
ISP(config)#int s0/0/0
ISP(config-if)#ppp authentication chap
ISP(config-if)#
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0/0/0, changed state to down

ISP(config-if)#

b. Enter the following commands into R3. The passwords must match for CHAP authentication:

R3(config)#username ISP secret cisco
R3(config)#int s0/1/0
R3(config-if)#ppp authentication chap
R3(config-if)#

Step 4: Test connectivity between computers and the webserver.

From PC and Laptop, ping the webserver at 209.165.200.2. Both ping commands should be successful. Remember to give enough time for STP and EIGRP to converge.

Packet Tracer PC Command Line 1.0
C:>ping 209.165.200.2

Pinging 209.165.200.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=125
Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=125
Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=125
Reply from 209.165.200.2: bytes=32 time=19ms TTL=125

Ping statistics for 209.165.200.2:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 2ms, Maximum = 19ms, Average = 7ms

C:>

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One thought on “Packet Tracer – Configuring PAP and CHAP Authentication”
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